!
!

SACD

!
Super Audio CD (SACD) was developed by Sony and Philips Electronics, the same companies that created the Compact Disc. SACD is a high-resolution, read-only optical audio disc format which, in contrast to the standard audio CD format, was designed to provide high-resolution audio in both stereo and surround sound modes. Introduced in 1999, SACD was not accepted by the mainstream market

Scart

!
SCART (from Syndicat des Constructeurs d'Appareils Radiorécepteurs et Téléviseurs, Radio and Television Receiver Manufacturers' Association) is a French-originated standard and associated 21-pin connector for connecting audio-visual (AV) equipment together. It is also known as Péritel (especially in France, where the term SCART is practically unknown) In Europe, SCART is the most common method of connecting audio-visual equipment together, and has become a standard connector for such devices however, it is far less common elsewhere in the world.

Simplay

!
Simplay Labs LLC develops HD performance standards, testing services, development tools, and technologies for manufacturers of CE and PC products.

Sink

!
A device that receives an HDMI signal, such as an HDTV.

Skin Effect

!
Skin effect is a tendency for alternating current to flow mostly near the outer surface of a solid electrical conductor, such as metal wire, at frequencies above the audio range. The effect becomes more and more apparent as the frequency increases.
The main problem with skin effect is that it increases the effective resistance of a wire at moderate to high frequencies, compared with the resistance of the same wire at direct current and low AC frequencies. The effect is most pronounced in the performance of high-fidelity sound equipment by causing attenuation in the treble range (the highest-pitched components of the audio).

Source

!
A device that sends an HDMI signal, such as a DVD player or Set-top box.

S-Video

!
S-Video is an analog video signal that carries the video data as two separate signals, lumen (luminance) and chroma (color). This differs from composite video which carries picture information as a single lower-quality signal, and component video which carries picture information as three separate higher-quality signals. S-Video carries standard definition video (typically at 480i or 576i resolution), but does not carry audio on the same cable.

VGA

!
The term Video Graphics Array (VGA) refers specifically to the display hardware first introduced with the IBM PS/2 line of computers in 1987, but through its widespread adoption has also come to mean either an analog computer display standard, the 15-pin D-subminiature VGA connector or the 640×480 resolution itself.

x.v.YCC

!
xvYCC or Extended-gamut YCC (also x.v.Color) is a color space that can be used in the video electronics of television sets to support a gamut 1.8 times as large as that of the sRGB color space. xvYCC was specified by the IEC in October 2005 and published in January 2006 as IEC 61966-2-4. The wider ranges of digital values allow representation of deeper greens, deeper reds, and deeper blues - and the intermediate colors previously beyond the boundary limit in the previous color space.

Y,Pb,Pr

!
YPbPr is a color space used in video electronics, in particular in reference to component video cables. YPbPr is the analog version of the YCBCR color space; the two are numerically equivalent, but YPBPR is designed for use in analog systems whereas YCBCR is intended for digital video. Signals that use YPbPr, like component video, offer enough separation of the signals that no multiplexing is needed, so the quality of the extracted image is generally near identical to the signal before encoding. Though, not necessarily an advantage to YPbPr, component video which uses YPbPr was the only one out of the other two common analog cable standards (composite and s-video) to be able to transfer non-interlaced video and at the same time able to transfer resolutions higher than 480i/p.