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IP-TV

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IPTV (Internet Protocol Television) is a system where a digital television service is delivered using Internet Protocol over a network infrastructure, that is, a broadband connection. A general definition of IPTV is television content that, instead of being delivered through traditional broadcast and cable formats, is received by the viewer through the technologies used for computer networks, all of which employ Internet Protocol.

Lipsync

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One of the new features enabled in HDMI 1.3, Lip Sync functionality enables the automatic synchronization of video and audio signals, correcting for processor lags that can force audio and video timing out of proper alignment.

Lossless Audio

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The latest multi-channel audio codecs are based on lossless compression algorithms with extremely high fidelity, such as Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD Master Audio.

Micro HDMI Connector

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A miniature HDMI connector, introduced in HDMI 1.4, designed for use in mobile phones, digital cameras and handheld products where space is at a premium. The micro connector is about 50% of the size of a mini connector.

Mini HDMI Connector

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A miniature HDMI connector, introduced in HDMI 1.3, designed for use in mobile and handheld products where space is at a premium. The Mini HDMI Connector is pin-for-pin compatible with the larger Standard HDMI Connector and completely compatible as well. The Mini HDMI Connector is referred to as the Type C Connector in the HDMI specification. See also Standard HDMI Connector.

PCM

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Pulse-code modulation (PCM) is a digital representation of an analog signal where the magnitude of the signal is sampled regularly at uniform intervals, then quantized to a series of symbols in a numeric (usually binary) code. PCM has been used in digital telephone systems and 1980s-era electronic musical keyboards. It is also the standard form for digital audio in computers and the compact disc "red book" format. It is also standard in digital video. Uncompressed PCM is not typically used for video in standard definition consumer applications such as DVD or DVR because the bit rate required is far too high. However, the next-generation Blu-ray format, which has a capacity far superior to previous medium, sometimes allows producers to include the full PCM soundtrack.

Pixels

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In digital imaging, a pixel (or picture element) is the smallest item of information in an image. Pixels are normally arranged in a 2-dimensional grid, and are often represented using dots, squares, or rectangles. Each pixel is a sample of an original image, where more samples typically provide more-accurate representations of the original. The intensity of each pixel is variable; in color systems, each pixel has typically three or four components such as red, green, and blue, or cyan, magenta, yellow, and black.

Resolution

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The term "display resolution" is usually used to mean pixel dimensions (e.g., 1280×1024), which does not tell anything about the resolution of the display on which the image is actually formed. In digital measurement the display resolution would be given in pixels per inch.

RGB

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The RGB color model is an additive color model in which red, green, and blue light are added together in various ways to reproduce a broad array of colors. The name of the model comes from the initials of the three additive primary colors, red, green, and blue.
The main purpose of the RGB color model is for the sensing, representation, and display of images in electronic systems, such as televisions and computers, though it has also been used in conventional photography. Before the electronic age, the RGB color model already had a solid theory behind it, based in human perception of colors.

S/PDIF

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The name stands for Sony/Philips Digital Interconnect Format (more commonly known as Sony Philips Digital InterFace), the two companies being the primary designers of the S/PDIF format. A common use for the S/PDIF interface is to carry compressed digital audio as defined by the standard IEC 61937. This mode is used to connect the output of a DVD player to a home theater receiver that supports Dolby Digital or DTS surround sound. Another common use is to carry uncompressed digital audio from a CD player to a receiver. This specification also allows for the coupling of personal computer digital sound (if equipped) via optical or coax to Dolby or DTS capable receivers.